Covid-19 Updates: March 19, 2020

Thursday March 19, 2020 Update:
 
We will continue to heed the advise of our elected officials and wise counsel of our medical community both in our communities and within our congregation. We will continue to be closed for the time being and continue to gather together ONLINE through Zoom. Our schedule for both Saturday services and Tuesday Night Bible Study remain the same, and any Rosh Chodesh or Feast Dates remain the same, with the exception that we will be holding the Feast Celebrations ONLINE within the home setting for the time being, until any further notice.
 
We know that this may be new and challenging for some of you who don’t normally join us Online, yet we want to encourage you all in knowing that we can still fulfill our Biblical mandate to convocate and gather together in unity through online technology. We can still interact, see one another, talk to one another through chat or audio and engage in through prayer, study and discussion.
 
Though the Coronavirus: Covid-19 has brought on some fear of the unknown and stress, we must remember to stay strong and lean on Yehovah and one another.
 
We also encourage you all to join us in Prayer & Fasting as we continue to seek protection, healing for those infected and continued guidance from The Father.
 
Along with our normal Monthly Fasting Schedule, we’d like to encourage you all to join us on a Weekly basis, every Wednesday-Thursday (from sundown to sundown) as we do a 24 hour complete Fast (No Food/Water). For those of you who want to step it up a notch, you can join us on a Daily basis, as we Fast Breakfast & Lunch as well (no snacks, only water as needed). For those of you who want to join us, please let us know, so that we can be here to encourage you and so that we can encourage one another along the way. You can also find it easier to fast along with the assistance of a Fasting App, Zero, is the one that we personally use on a daily basis. You can also learn more about fasting on our Fasting article below.
 
 

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Covid-19 Update for Services

How is Beth Ohr Messianic responding to COVID-19?

We want to respond to the situation at hand with responsibility and with wisdom, as we have members with compromised immune systems who might be susceptible to infection.
 
Shaul wrote in 2 Timothy 1:7, “For Elohim has not given us a spirit of cowardice, but of power and of love and of self-control..” In an effort to do our part to keep the congregants of Beth Ohr Messianic safe, we have decided to cancel all services and on-site activities until further notice. During this time, we will continue to minister to you and your families.
 
We will not be meeting at our physical location, but we are still going to meet together online through Zoom. Regular weekly services will all be online at our normal service times. Please make use of all the resources available to you through our website, our app and on Zoom
 
Most importantly, know that we are praying for you and for the people who have been affected by this virus. If you have any questions in the days to come, be sure to follow our website or app for any upcoming announcements. We are managing this situation moment by moment and will continue to pray for guidance and direction on our next steps moving forward as the Spring High Holy Days are soon approaching.
 
Please visit our Livestream Page to join us for services through Zoom, if you have any questions, please call or contact us if you need help connecting.

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Covid-19 Prayer

Chief Rabbi composes special prayer to halt plague

The Rishon L’Tzion, Israel’s Chief Rabbi Yitzchak Yosef composed a special prayer to stop the COVID-19 coronavirus epidemic.
The prayer should be said when the Holy Ark is opened on Shabbat, Mondays, and Thursdays when the Torah is read publicly:
May it be Thy Will our G-d and G-d and our ancestors, that You be overcome with mercy upon all the world’s inhabitants and upon the inhabitants of this land, and protect them from all the harsh and evil decrees that may visit the world, and rescue us from every sickness, disease, plague, and epidemic. May all patients infected with the disease be completely cured. To You O G-d is the Greatness and the Rigor, the Splendor and the Eternity and the Majesty, because all in Heaven and Earth to You do individually concede the Kingship and the Authority, and in Your hands is the soul of all living and the spirit within all flesh, and it is in your Power and Strength to grow and strengthen and cure humanity to the utmost, to the most minuscule reaches of the spirit, and nothing is beyond Your Ability.
 
Therefore, may it be Thy Will O Faithful G-d, Father of Mercy, Healer of all ills among His People Israel, You Who are the Faithful Healer: Send healing and cure, and act with utmost kindness, pardon, and compassion to all patients infected with this disease.
 
Please O G-d, may Your Mercy awaken upon all inhabitants of the world and all Your People Israel. Please alight Thine Throne of Judgement and sit upon the Throne of Mercy, and go beyond the letter of the law to abolish all harsh and evil decrees. “And Pinchas arose and prayed and the plague was halted.”
 
And decree upon us good judgments, salvation, and consolation for the sake of Thy Mercy, and tear up our evil decree, and may our good points hold prominence before you; Arise, help us and redeem us for the sake of Your Kindness.
 
Hear now please the voice of our plea, for You hear the prayers of all; Blessed is He Who hears prayer.
 
May the utterances of my mouth and the reasoning within my heart find favor before You, O L-rd my Rock and Salvation.
 
And may it be fulfilled within us the Bible verse that says: “All the sickness I placed upon Egypt I shall not place upon you, for I am the L-rd your Healer,” Amen. 
The Rishon L’Tzion, Israel’s Chief Rabbi Yitzchak Yosef composed a special prayer to stop the COVID-19 coronavirus epidemic.
The prayer should be said when the Holy Ark is opened on Shabbat, Mondays, and Thursdays when the Torah is read publicly:
May it be Thy Will our G-d and G-d and our ancestors, that You be overcome with mercy upon all the world’s inhabitants and upon the inhabitants of this land, and protect them from all the harsh and evil decrees that may visit the world, and rescue us from every sickness, disease, plague, and epidemic. May all patients infected with the disease be completely cured. To You O G-d is the Greatness and the Rigor, the Splendor and the Eternity and the Majesty, because all in Heaven and Earth to You do individually concede the Kingship and the Authority, and in Your hands is the soul of all living and the spirit within all flesh, and it is in your Power and Strength to grow and strengthen and cure humanity to the utmost, to the most minuscule reaches of the spirit, and nothing is beyond Your Ability.
 
Therefore, may it be Thy Will O Faithful G-d, Father of Mercy, Healer of all ills among His People Israel, You Who are the Faithful Healer: Send healing and cure, and act with utmost kindness, pardon, and compassion to all patients infected with this disease.
 
Please O G-d, may Your Mercy awaken upon all inhabitants of the world and all Your People Israel. Please alight Thine Throne of Judgement and sit upon the Throne of Mercy, and go beyond the letter of the law to abolish all harsh and evil decrees. “And Pinchas arose and prayed and the plague was halted.”
 
And decree upon us good judgments, salvation, and consolation for the sake of Thy Mercy, and tear up our evil decree, and may our good points hold prominence before you; Arise, help us and redeem us for the sake of Your Kindness.
 
Hear now please the voice of our plea, for You hear the prayers of all; Blessed is He Who hears prayer.
 
May the utterances of my mouth and the reasoning within my heart find favor before You, O L-rd my Rock and Salvation.
 
And may it be fulfilled within us the Bible verse that says: “All the sickness I placed upon Egypt I shall not place upon you, for I am the L-rd your Healer,” Amen. 

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Redeeming the Times

Redeeming the Times for the Days Are Evil

By Rabbi Brian Hawkins

In light of Daylight Saving Time, Purim, Mardi Gras, and the many holidays this month which bring about revelry, let us remember to redeem the times for the days are evil.

 
Therefore, pay careful attention to how you conduct your life — live wisely, not unwisely. Use your time well, for these are evil days. So don’t be foolish, but try to understand what the will of the Lord is. Don’t get drunk with wine, because it makes you lose control. Instead, keep on being filled with the Spirit — Ephesians 5:15-18

In these last of the last days, we REALLY need to pay careful attention to how we are living, for we have so many distractions that can lead us away from Yeshua. We have to be wise and walk according to Torah and not according to our own thoughts and opinions because our opinions will only lead us to ruin and confusion.

We live in the most evil of times that we have seen, since the time of Noah and that is no exaggeration. In a world where we call evil good and good evil, it is hard not to be tempted to “slip” or “backslide”.  These are but mere excuses for we have the Ruach Ha Kodesh living inside of us, therefore, we do not have any excuse to slip or backslide. We choose to do so! We have sanctioned homosexuality, abortion on demand, and drug use as acceptable and the norm. As believers, we’ve sanctioned gossiping, slandering, divisiveness and maliciousness as tolerable within the Body of Messiah. We have also adopted Pagan Holidays, such as Halloween, Christmas, Valentine’s and Easter to name a few, as fun, exciting and entertaining. When we slip into these lifestyles of darkness, we are being foolish and are not understanding the will of YHVH. What exactly is the will of YHVH? His will is for us to follow His Word…ALL OF HIS WORD! Not just to Eeney Meeney Miney Moe, catch Yeshua by His toe! We pick and choose what we want to do in the Word of God and then those things which we do choose, we only do half heartedly.

We also need to remember not to get drunk on wine or any other substance for that matter which can lead to addiction and open up the door to the enemy. Rather, we are to be filled with the Holy Spirit, for it is a scriptural command. When are we going to start living in the fullness of the Spirit? When we decide that we are going to live a life full of His Spirit – by following His commands, walking in love, remaining in His word through prayer and fasting… then we will start seeing miracles and revival among the Body of Messiah once more. So let us redeem the time for the days are evil! 


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Atoned For

Yom Kippur, better known as the Day of the Coverings, is the time when we remember Yeshua being our final sacrifice, as he gave up His precious Life for us, to atone for our sin and punishment. What a Blessing it is to know that we know longer have to lay our sins symbolically before a bull or scapegoat for our sin which would have ultimately lead to death. Yet Yeshua selflessly took our filth and destruction upon Himself, in order that we might live and be redeemed. Yet, this free gift of atonement is so taken lightly and ungratefully by many. May we strive to live lives worthy to have received this eternal gift of life and freedom from the Law of sin & death.
 
So in every way He had to be made like His brothers, in order to become a compassionate and trustworthy High Priest in matters related to Elohim, to make atonement for the sins of the people.

Hebrews 2:17

We must examine our hearts every day and ask ourselves, “are we truly living out Yeshua’s Will? Are we honoring Him with our Lips, our Ears, our Hands, our Eyes, our Bodies, our Families, our Jobs, our Finances, our Possessions, our Time, our abilities and Talents? Are we striving to keep His Temple, our Bodies, clean and healthy for His glory and honor? Are we remembering to practice the Fruits of the Spirit every day and every minute of the day? Are we remembering to be quick to repent and turn away from our sin, to be quick to forgive and forget?

See, this is True Worship, that we might Worship Him with ALL our being according to Romans 12:1-2
 
So ask yourself now, are you truly atoned for?
 

By Virginia Hawkins


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How Yom Teruah Became Rosh Hashanah

On the 1st day of the Seventh Month (Tishrei) the Torah commands us to observe the holy day of Yom Teruah which means “Day of Shouting” (Leviticus 23:23-25; Numbers 29:1-6). Yom Teruah is a day of rest on which work is forbidden.

One of the unique things about Yom Teruah is that the Torah does not say what the purpose of this holy day is. The Torah gives at least one reason for all the other holy days and two reasons for some. The Feast of Matzot (Unleavened Bread) commemorates the Exodus from Egypt, but it is also a celebration of the beginning of the barley harvest (Exodus 23:15; Leviticus 23:4–14). The Feast of Shavuot (Weeks) is a celebration of the wheat harvest (Exodus 23:16; 34:22). Yom Ha-Kippurim is a national day of atonement as described in great detail in Leviticus 16. Finally, the Feast of Sukkot (Booths) commemorates the wandering of the Israelites in the desert and is also a celebration of the ingathering of agricultural produce (Exodus 23:16). In contrast to all these Torah festivals, Yom Teruah has no clear purpose other than that we are commended to rest on this day.

Nevertheless, the name of Yom Teruah provides a clue as to its purpose. Teruah literally means to make a loud noise. This word can describe the noise made by a trumpet but it also describes the noise made by a large gathering of people shouting in unison (Numbers 10:5–6). For example,

“And it shall come to pass when the ram’s horn makes a long blast, when you hear the sound of the shofar, the entire nation will shout a great shout, and the wall of the city shall fall in its place, and the people shall go up as one man against it.”

-Joshua 6:5

In this verse the word “shout” appears twice, once as the verb form of Teruah and a second time as the noun form of Teruah. Although this verse mentions the sound of the shofar (ram’s horn), the two instances of Teruah do not refer to the shofar. In fact, in this verse, Teruah refers to the shouting of the Israelites which was followed by the fall of the walls of Jericho.

While the Torah does not explicitly tell us the purpose of Yom Teruah, its name may indicate that it is intended as a day of public prayer. The verb form of Teruah often refers to the noise made by a gathering of the faithful calling out to the Almighty in unison. For example:
 
  • “Clap hands, all nations, shout to God, with a singing voice!” (Psalms 47:2)
  • Shout to God, all the earth!” (Psalms 66:1)
  • “Sing to God, our strength, shout to the God of Jacob!” (Psalms 81:2)
  • Shout to Yehovah, all the earth!” (Psalms 100:1)

In Leviticus 23:24, Yom Teruah is also referred to as Zichron Teruah. The word Zichron is sometimes translated as “memorial”, but this Hebrew word also means to “mention”, often in reference to speaking the name of Yehovah. For example, Exodus 3:15; Isaiah 12:4; Isaiah 26:13; Psalms 45:18. The day of Zichron Teruah, the “Mentioning Shout”, may refer to a day of gathering in public prayer in which the crowd of the faithful shouts the name of Yehovah in unison.

Today, few people remember the biblical name of Yom Teruah and instead it is widely known as “Rosh Hashanah” which literally means “head of the year” and hence also “New Years”. The transformation of Yom Teruah (Day of Shouting) into Rosh Hashanah (New Years) is the result of pagan Babylonian influence upon the Jewish nation. The first stage in the transformation was the adoption of the Babylonian month names. In the Torah, the months are numbered as First Month, Second Month, Third Month, etc (Leviticus 23; Numbers 28). During their sojourn in Babylonia our ancestors began to use the pagan Babylonian month names, a fact readily admitted in the Talmud:

“The names of the months came up with them from Babylonia.” (Jerusalem Talmud, Rosh Hashanah 1:2 56d)

The pagan nature of the Babylonian month names is epitomized by the fourth month known as Tammuz. In the Babylonian religion, Tammuz was the god of grain whose annual death and resurrection brought fertility to the world. In the book of Ezekiel, the prophet described a journey to Jerusalem in which he saw the Jewish women sitting in the Temple “weeping over Tammuz” (Ezekiel 8:14). The reason they were weeping over Tammuz is that, according to Babylonian mythology, Tammuz had been slain but had not yet been resurrected. In ancient Babylonia, the time for weeping over Tammuz was the early summer, when the rains cease throughout the Middle East and green vegetation is burnt by the unrelenting sun. To this day the Fourth Month in the rabbinical calendar is known as the month of Tammuz and it is still a time for weeping and mourning.

Some of the Babylonian month names found their way into the later books of the Tanakh, but they always appear alongside the Torah month names. For example, Esther 3:7 says:

“In the First Month, which is the month of Nissan, in the twelfth year of King Achashverosh.”

This verse starts off by giving the Torah name for the month (“First Month”) and then translates this month into its pagan equivalent (“which is the month of Nissan”). By the time of Esther, all the Jews lived within the boundaries of the Persian Empire and the Persians had adopted the Babylonian calendar for the civil administration of their realm. At first, the Jews used these Babylonian month names alongside the Torah month names, but over time the Torah month names fell into disuse.

As the Jewish People became more comfortable with the Babylonian month names, they became more susceptible to other Babylonian influences. This is similar to the way that American Jews observe  Hanukkah as a Jewish version of Christmas. This influence began with the seemingly harmless custom of giving gifts on Hanukkah. Until the Jews arrived in America this custom was unknown and it is still a rarity in Israel where Hanukkah does not need to compete with Christmas for the hearts and minds of the Jewish youth. Once Hanukkah took on this relatively trivial aspect of Christmas, it became ripe for more significant influences. Today, many American Jews have established the custom of setting up a “Hanukkah bush” as a Jewish alternative to the Christmas tree. These Jews did not want to adopt Christmas outright so they “Judaized” the Christmas tree and incorporated into Hanukkah. This example shows how easy it is to be influenced by the practices of a foreign religion, especially when there is some similarity to begin with. The fact that Hanukkah often falls out around the same time as Christmas made it natural for American Jews to incorporate elements of Christmas into their observance of Hanukkah.

Just as the Jews of America have been influenced by Christmas, the ancient Rabbis were influenced by the pagan Babylonian religion. Although many Jews returned to Judea when the Exile officially ended in 516 BCE, the forebears of the Rabbis remained behind in Babylonia where rabbinical Judaism gradually took shape. Many of the earliest known Rabbis such as Hillel I were born and educated in Babylonia. Indeed, Babylonia remained the heartland of Rabbinical Judaism until the fall of the Gaonate in the 11th Century CE. The Babylonian Talmud abounds with the influences of Babylonian paganism. Indeed, pagan deities even appear in the Talmud recycled as “Jewish” angels and demons.1

One field of Babylonian religious influence was in the observance of Yom Teruah as a New Years celebration. From very early times the Babylonians had a lunar-solar calendar very similar to the biblical calendar. The result was that Yom Teruah often fell out on the same day as the Babylonian New Years festival of “Akitu”. The Babylonian Akitu fell out on the 1st day of Tishrei which coincided with Yom Teruah on the 1st day of the Seventh Month. When Jews started calling the “Seventh Month” by the Babylonian name “Tishrei”, it paved the way for turning Yom Teruah into a Jewish Akitu. At the same time, the Rabbis did not want to adopt Akitu outright so they Judaized it by changing the name of Yom Teruah (Day of Shouting) to Rosh Hashanah (New Years). The fact that the Torah did not give a reason for Yom Teruah no doubt made it easier for the Rabbis to proclaim it the Jewish New Years.

It is outright bizarre to celebrate Yom Teruah as New Years. This biblical festival falls out on the first day of the Seventh Month. However, in the context of Babylonian culture this was perfectly natural. The Babylonians actually celebrated Akitu, New Years, twice every year, once on the first of Tishrei and again six months later on the first of Nissan. The first Babylonian Akitu celebration coincided with Yom Teruah and the second Akitu coincided with the actual New Years in the Torah on the first day of the First Month. While the Rabbis proclaimed Yom Teruah to be New Years, they still recognized that the 1st day of the “First Month” in the Torah was, as its name implied, also a New Years. They could hardly deny this based on Exodus 12:2 which says:

“This month shall be for you the beginning of months; it is first of the months of the year.”

The context of this verse speaks about the celebration of the Feast of Unleavened Bread which falls out in the First Month. In light of this verse, the Rabbis could not deny that the first day of the First Month was a biblical New Years. But in the cultural context of Babylonia, where Akitu was celebrated as New Years twice a year, it made perfect sense that Yom Teruah could be a second New Years even though it was in the Seventh Month.

In contrast to Babylonian paganism, the Torah does not say or imply that Yom Teruah has anything to do with New Years. On the contrary, the Feast of Sukkot (Booths), which takes place exactly two weeks after Yom Teruah, is referred to in one verse as “the going out of the year” (Exodus 23:16). This would be like calling January 15 in the modern Western calendar “the going out of the year”. the Torah would not describe Sukkot in this manner if it intended Yom Teruah to be celebrated as a New Years.

Some modern Rabbis have argued that Yom Teruah is actually referred to as Rosh Hashanah in Ezekiel 40:1, which describes a vision that the prophet had, “At the beginning of the year (Rosh Hashanah) on the tenth of the month”. In fact, Ezekiel 40:1 proves that the phrase “Rosh Hashanah” does not mean “New Years”. Instead, it retains its literal sense of “the head of the year” referring to the First Month in the Torah calendar. The 10th day of Rosh Hashanah in Ezekiel 40:1 refers to the 10th day of the First Month.

Yom Teruah is mentioned in the following biblical passages:
 
  • “And Yehovah spoke unto Moses saying, Speak to the Children of Israel saying, In the Seventh month on the first of the month will be a day of rest (Shabbaton) for you, a Remembrance Shouting, a holy convocation. You shall do no work and you will bring a fire sacrifice to Yehovah.” Leviticus 23:23-25
  • “And in the Seventh month on the first of the month will be a holy convocation for you; you shall do no work, it will be a Day of Shouting for you…” Numbers 29:1-6

Q: What about Leviticus 25:9?

A: Some people have argued that Yom Teruah should be considered New Years because it is the beginning of the Sabbatical year. However, the Torah does not say that Yom Teruah is the beginning of the Sabbatical year and all indications are that the Sabbatical year begins on the 1st day of the First Month. The Torah does say the following:

“And you shall pass a shofar of blasting in the Seventh Month on the tenth of the month; on the Day of Atonement, you shall pass a shofar throughout all your land.” (Leviticus 25:9)

This verse is saying that a shofar should be used to announce the arrival of the Jubilee year, the 50th year in the Sabbatical system. It does not say that the Jubilee begins on the Day of Atonement, only that the impending arrival of the Jubilee year is announced on the Day of Atonement. The shofar is to be passed throughout the land on Yom Kippur of the 49th year, six months before the beginning of the coming Jubilee year. This interpretation is supported by the immediate context in Leviticus 25. Verse 8 says to count forty nine years, verse 9 says to pass the shofar throughout the land, and verse 10 says to proclaim the 50th year as the Jubilee. This shows that the shofar announcing the coming Jubilee in verse 9 is passed through the land before the Jubilee is actually proclaimed in verse 10.

Q: Isn’t the Seventh Month the beginning of the agricultural cycle?

A: In the Torah the middle of the Seventh Month is actually the end of the agriculture cycle, specifically of the grain cycle. In the Land of Israel, grains are planted in Autumn and harvested in Spring. The new agricultural cycle would not actually begin until the plowing of the fields. This would not take place until the first light rains which moisten the ground enough to be broken by iron and wooden plows. In the Land of Israel, this could be as early as the middle of the Seventh Month but is usually in the Eighth Month or later. By the above logic, the Eighth Month should be considered the beginning of the year, not the Seventh Month.
By Nehemiah Gordon

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Messiah’s Faithfulness Each New Month

Though many are familiar with the weekly Sabbath and yearly festivals God gave to Israel, there is another appointed time which is not as well-known.  Rosh Chodesh (literally “Head of the Month”) is observed each month at the New Moon, marking the beginning of a new month on the Hebrew calendar.
We see in Paul’s writings that the early believers were familiar with Rosh Chodesh, just as they were with all of God’s appointed times:

“Therefore no one is to act as your judge in regard to food or drink or in respect to a Festival or a New Moon or a Sabbath day – things which are a shadow of what is to come; but the substance belongs to Messiah”

(Colossians 2:16)

Before the Temple was destroyed in 70 A.D., each of these times were marked by the sacrifices which the priests brought before the Lord.  Though sacrifices were made daily and weekly on the Sabbath, God commanded special sacrifices to be made monthly as well:

 “Then at the beginning of each of your months you shall present a burnt offering to the LORD: two bulls and one ram, seven male lambs one year old without defect; and three-tenths of an ephah of fine flour mixed with oil for a grain offering, for each bull; and two-tenths of fine flour mixed with oil for a grain offering, for the one ram; and a tenth of an ephah of fine flour mixed with oil for a grain offering for each lamb, for a burnt offering of a soothing aroma, an offering by fire to the LORD. ‘Their drink offerings shall be half a hin of wine for a bull and a third of a hin for the ram and a fourth of a hin for a lamb; this is the burnt offering of each month throughout the months of the year. ‘And one male goat for a sin offering to the LORD; it shall be offered with its drink offering in addition to the continual burnt offering.”

(Numbers 28:11-15)
The primary sacrifice made at Rosh Chodesh was the burnt offering of 2 bulls, 1 ram, and 7 male lambs, along with their grain and drink offerings.  These burnt offerings (

olah in Hebrew) symbolized the total devotion of the people to the Lord.  However, these were not the only offerings to be made.   There was also the sin offering: one male goat.  In Scripture, the goat (aiz

in Hebrew) symbolizes strength and willfulness.

Through the burnt offerings, the month is totally dedicated to the Lord; dedication, however, is an act of the will, and in this we all have the propensity to become willfull, stubborn, and resistant to God, the very one we are dedicated to (Deut. 9:6, Neh. 9:16, Zech 7:11, Rom. 2:5, Heb. 10:26, etc.).  Both then and now, this rebellious nature of humanity necessitates an offering for sin as well.

As we see in the chart below, Messiah’s sacrifice has fulfilled the requirements for each of these offerings before God.  He has become our burnt offering who “gave Himself up for us” (Eph. 5:2), as well as our sin offering:

“He made Him who knew no sin to be sin (offering) on our behalf, so that we might become the righteousness of God in Him.”

(2 Cor. 5:21)

In Messiah’s atonement, we no longer have the need to sacrifice animals before God.  However, like the early believers, God’s appointed times can continue to mark our days, weeks, months, and years as we remember the perfect sacrifice of our Messiah.

So, each month Rosh Chodesh is a time of renewal of our volitional dedication to the Lord.  It also reminds us of our need of Messiah’s sin offering for us as we recognize our dependence not on our own dedication, but on His sacrifice in our service to God.  Messiah fulfilled every sacrifice for us, and so on Rosh Chodesh we appreciate again what He has done in each facet of His death for our sins.

Rosh Chodesh Sameach!  (Happy New Moon)

Messiah Our Offering:

The Spiritual Significance of the Five Major Biblical Offerings

                                                                                                            

The Offering The Leviticus portion The Significance The Fulfillment 
 1) Burnt (Olah)  Lev. 1; 6:8-13  Total Devotion  Eph. 5: 2 
 2) Grain (Minchah)  Lev. 2; 6:14-24  Consistent service  Jn. 6: 33, 35 
 3) Peace (Shalom)   Lev. 3; 7:11-34  United fellowship  1 Cor. 10:16; 11:25; Eph. 2:13-16; Col 1:20-22; Heb 13:15, 20; Rev 3:20 
 4) Sin (Chatat)  Lev. 4; 5:1-13  Mortifying our nature  2 Cor. 5:21; Rom 3:25; 8:3; Heb 9:26; 10:5-18; 13:12 
 5) Guilt (Asham)   Lev. 5:14- 6: 7; 7:1-10  Compensation paid  Eph. l: 7; 1 Cor 11:27; 2 Cor. 5:19; Isa 53:10

By Sam Nadler
Word of Messiah Ministries

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